Contributors

James Bridle is a British artist and writer based in Athens, Greece.

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Through Non-Human Eyes

November 2016

The steadiness and endurance of the camera’s gaze produces the strong sense that the camera is something other than an extension of the eye: it is a sensor, a monitor, a machine for being with and in the world.

Adam Brown is Senior Lecturer in Photography at London South Bank University.

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How to photograph onion skins.

September 2016

What is success? In the past, a successful photographic career led ultimately to a monograph or a retrospective. Let’s unbox one.

Paolo Cirio is a conceptual artist and an activist that engages with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society.

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Internet Photography

November 2016

Photography of the Internet extends to unprecedented social fields and challenges of social norms for questioning cultural, economic and ethical values of photos circulating within the networks.

David Raymond Conroy (b. 1978 Reading) is an artist that lives and works in Brussels and London.

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Where someone said they saw some smoke, there very well may be no fire.

February 2017

For the (conspiracy) theorist, the beauty of images is that they have the power to become simultaneously a source of proof and doubt.
Look again, don’t you see that?
There it is.
Gone.

Geoff Cox is Associate Professor in the School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus University (DK).

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Ways of Machine Seeing

November 2016

“The relation between what we see and what we know is never settled.”

Andrew Dewdney is a research professor at London South Bank University whose current research is focused upon the intersections of art, media and technology.

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The University of YouTube: the medium, the user, photography and the search for really useful knowledge.

September 2016

This short text is the result of an attempt to understand photographic theory by YouTube, which took the shape of an online errand of forking paths, full of interesting digressions, leading of course everywhere and nowhere.

EFTD (Embassy for the Displaced) is a faux-institution established between London, Athens, and the Aegean archipelago.

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Nyktopolitics

May 2017

When does the human need to leave the image? And what takes his/her place?
How can one attempt to image a life severed by representation, and who has the ethical right to attempt such an aberrant, aniconic distortion?

Francis Gooding works with music, art and film.

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Artifact Readers: pixelated revelations, glitch augury and low-res millenarianism in the age of conspiracy theory

February 2017

These images, drawn from films made by members of the YouTube conspiracy theorist community, are presented as evidence for the radically heterodox alternate worldviews of their original creators.

Natalie Kane is a writer, curator and researcher working at the intersection of digital culture, futures and design.

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Soft Power / Hard Meme

February 2017

In early 2016, @RussianEmbassy, the verified Twitter account from the Russian Embassy in the UK, sent an image to the Russian Ministry of Defence via Twitter, warning that ‘Extremists near Aleppo received several truckloads of chemical ammo.' On further inspection, rather than a matter of urgency, it became immediately apparent that these were neither extremist trucks, nor was it in fact an actual photograph of real trucks at all.

Gretta Louw is a South African-born Australian artist, writer, and curator whose practice explores the potential of art as a means of investigating psycho-social and cultural phenomena, particularly in relation to digital technologies and the internet.

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Manifest Destiny in the Digital Age

May 2017

Information asymmetry is power asymmetry. If “data is the new oil” in the 21st Century, then internet users are the raw earth from which this oil is extracted; a commodity to be exploited for the benefit of the oil barons. In this, there is at least some equity amongst users around the world: the parity of the powerless. Except that isn’t accurate either.

Visual artist, computer programmer and data activist. Lives and works between Brussels and London.

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“The cat sits on the bed”, Pedagogies of vision in human and machine learning.

September 2016

Our shares and likes, our annotations and social metadata are training a generation of AI agents. Everyday, we are already all teaching bots and algorithms how to look at images. If we consider the extent of our relationship with algorithms, we realise the magnitude of the effort of teaching and learning that is taking place.

The politics of image search - A conversation with Sebastian Schmieg [Part I]

May 2017

Nicolas Malevé interviews the artist Sebastian Schmieg on image annotation, immaterial labour and his TPG commission 'Decision Space'.

The politics of image search - A conversation with Sebastian Schmieg [Part II]

August 2017

The second part of the interview between Sebastian Schmieg and Nicolas Malevé. Schmieg reflects on his project 'Search by Image' and further discusses machine learning and intelligence as well the politics of image annotation.

Joanne McNeil is a writer interested in the ways that technology is shaping art, politics, and society.

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Listening to a Face

November 2016

“The truth is written all over our faces” was a tagline for Lie to Me, a procedural drama on network television several years ago.

Joana Moll is an artist and researcher based in Barcelona.

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AZ: MOVE AND GET SHOT

November 2016

A net-based work created entirely by algorithms that have been automatically collecting images of six surveillance cameras placed on the US/Mexico Border from 2011 until 2014.

Maria/Rosario Montero is an artist and founder of the Border Agency Art Collective.

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An interview with Morehshin Allahyari

September 2017

Maria Rosario Montero interviews Morehshin Allahyari on the occasion of the latter's commission 'She Who Sees the Unknown: Ya'Jooj Ma'Jooj' at The Photographers' Gallery Media Wall (2017). Allahyari discusses digital colonialism as a core concept in her work as well as the agency of feminist and activist practices using 3D scanning, 3D printing and storytelling.

Professor Jussi Parikka is a Finnish media theorist who works at the Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton.

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Hidden in Plain Sight: The Steganographic Image

February 2017

Who knows what went into an image, what it includes and what it hides? This is not merely a question of fine art historical importance of materials, or even media historical intrigue of chemistry but one of steganography - hiding another meaningful pattern, perhaps a message, in data; inside text or an image.

Nye Thompson is a London-based visual artist and software designer.

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Domestic (in)security

May 2017

These (in)security cameras are all around us. In our streets, shops, buses, restaurants, homes. They are looking, listening and recording. Their omnipresent gaze pierces, protects us, keeps us safe. Through them we are delivered from unknown evils, from the nameless things that might creep up on us if we don’t watch out. Through their panopticon gaze we are quantified, verified, analysed, documented, mapped, filtered and judged.

Alan Warburton is an artist, animator and researcher whose work critically reflects on CGI software culture.

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Bursting The Filter Bubble of Photoshop Tutorials

September 2016

As an artist using 3D animation software, much of my work comes in trying to introduce noise, dirt and detail into sterile, mathematically derived images. CGI wants to be photographic. Conversely, Adobe Photoshop is anchored to the photographic realm but strives to efface it.