Contributors

A-Z
# A B C D E F G H J K L M N O P S T W X Y
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/p

[1]
The artist /p has been collaborating with Tamiko since 2018 on many media art projects.

The artist /p has been collaborating with Tamiko since 2018 on many media art projects.

A

Aarati Akkapeddi

[1]
Aarati Akkapeddi is a first-generation, Telugu-American, interdisciplinary artist, educator, and programmer interested in the poetics and politics of datasets.

Aarati Akkapeddi is a first-generation, Telugu-American, interdisciplinary artist, educator, and programmer interested in the poetics and politics of datasets. Their work touches on themes of intergenerational memory, loss, and diaspora.

Akkapeddi works with both personal and institutional archives to explore how identities and histories are shaped by different methods of collecting, preserving, and presenting data. They combine code, machine learning and analog techniques (photography, printmaking, & embossing), and often use family photographs and archival images as a source material, creating performative rituals of information extraction.

Adam Brown

[1]
Adam Brown is Senior Lecturer in Photography at London South Bank University.

Adam Brown is Senior Lecturer in Photography at London South Bank University. A graduate of Fine Art at Gwent under Roy Ascott, he was Course Leader for BA(Hons) Photography and Media Arts at UCA Maidstone, and lectured in Photography at James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. From 2000-2005 he ran the darkrooms and studio at Photofusion in Brixton. His publications and conference presentations expand on a long-standing interest in the politics of the photographic representation of the built environment.
In October 2015, he presented his on-going art project Buncefield Soundsystem at The Photographers’ Gallery, London as part of their regular Social programme. The Soundsystem project represents public outputs of the artist’s ‘record label,’ and takes the forms of interactive presentations and DJ performances.

Adam Milner

[1]
Adam Milner is an artist whose sprawling and idiosyncratic practice includes sculptures, drawings, videos, texts, and interventions which draw from deeply personal experiences to point toward broader …

Adam Milner is an artist whose sprawling and idiosyncratic practice includes sculptures, drawings, videos, texts, and interventions which draw from deeply personal experiences to point toward broader ethics around how we engage with the things around us. Collecting, archiving, and hoarding are considered for what these practices can reveal about value, power, desire, and care. Milner has exhibited at the Mattress Factory, The Warhol, Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, Aspen Art Museum, Casa Maauad, and Galería Mascota, among others. Milner received an MFA from Carnegie Mellon University (2017), is a recent participant of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (2018), and is currently a fellow with Black Cube Nomadic Museum. Milner lives and works in Brooklyn.
adammilner.com

Aladin Borioli

[1]
Born in 1988 in Switzerland, Aladin Borioli lives and work between Bevaix, Switzerland, and London. His work borrows methods from anthropology and philosophy and combines them with the practice of …

Born in 1988 in Switzerland, Aladin Borioli lives and work between Bevaix, Switzerland, and London. He holds a BA in Photography at the Ecole Cantonale d’Art de Lausanne and a MA in Visual and Media Anthropology from the Freie Universität Berlin. He is currently pursuing a certificate programme in Critical Philosophy at The New Centre for Research and Practice. His work borrows methods from anthropology and philosophy and combines them with the practice of art and beekeeping. Since 2014 he has been building a self-proclaimed ministry of bees called Apian, which explores the age-old interspecies relationship between bees and humans. The results are polymorphous ethnographies, which mix different media such as text, photography, sound, videos. Apian also aims to be collaborative and has been a site for meeting around shared sensibilities, for example with the biologist and zoologist Randolf Menzel and the artists Laurent Güdel and Ellen Lapper. This project has recently been exhibited at Eyebeam 2021, Images Vevey 2020, ICA London 2020 or CTM Festival Berlin 2019, among others. In 2020, the book Hives / Ruches (RVB/Images Vevey, 2020), a visual atlas of the beehive, was published.

Alan Warburton

[2]
Alan Warburton is an artist, animator and researcher whose work critically reflects on CGI software culture.

Alan Warburton is an artist, animator and researcher whose work critically reflects on CGI software culture. His work has screened and exhibited internationally at venues including The Southbank Centre, Laboral, HeK Basel, Kunstlerhaus Bethanien Berlin, The Barbican, The Photographer’s Gallery and The Austrian Film Museum. His work can be seen at alanwarburton.co.uk and further documentation and research appears on cgwtf.com

Alexander Mikhaylov

[0]
Alexander Mikhaylov (D3mark0) is the artist, owner, and curator of Krasnaya Gallery.

Alexander Mikhaylov (D3mark0) is the artist, owner, and curator of Krasnaya Gallery.

Andrew Dewdney

[3]
Andrew Dewdney is a research professor at London South Bank University whose current research is focused upon the intersections of art, media and technology.

Andrew Dewdney is a research professor at London South Bank University whose current research is focused upon the intersections of art, media and technology. He is currently co-authoring a book upon how the discourses of art, media and technology play out in the contemporary art museum. From 2007 until 2010 he was the principal investigator of a major national AHRC funded project in collaboration with Tate Britain entitled Tate Encounters: Britshness and Visual Cultures. In 2014 he collaborated with Tate and The Royal College of Art on an AHRC funded research project looking at Cultural Value and the Digital in the Museum. He is an advisory board member for the peer-reviewed journals Photographies and Philosophy of Photography. He is a member of the board of trustees of Culture24. He has written, presented and published widely within media, communications and museology.

Arieh Frosh

[1]
Arieh Frosh is a Producer of the Digital Programme at The Photographers' Gallery, and a cross disciplinary artist.

Arieh Frosh is a Producer of the Digital Programme at The Photographers' Gallery and a cross disciplinary artist. He is a 2023 East Gallery Fellow at Norwich University of the Arts where his research considers how the meeting of contemporary offshore wind turbines with the geological history of Doggerland could be a tool to creatively explore the historical, cultural, and political narratives surrounding wind energy and oceanic thinking.

B

Benjamin Hall

[1]
Benjamin Hall is an artist, technologist, filmmaker and writer based between Glasgow and Liverpool.

Benjamin Hall is an artist, technologist, filmmaker and writer based between Glasgow and Liverpool. They consider their practice to be an exercise in immersive storytelling, futuristic worldbuilding and archival adaptation using virtual production technology, both independently and collaboratively. This work has received recognition from Prix Ars Electronica, the Dazed 100, CIRCA’s Class of…, The Face, Bloomberg New Contemporaries, BALTIC Gateshead, CCA Glasgow and more, and has been both exhibited and published internationally. Benjamin is also FACT Liverpool's programme technologist, a core member of spur.world and DAAD Futurism, and has developed projects freelance with artists such as Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley (FACT), Hervisions (Saatchi Gallery), R.I.P. Germain (ICA and Two Queens).

C

Caroline Sinders

[1]
Caroline Sinders is a critical designer and artist. For the past few years, she has been examining the intersections of artificial intelligence, abuse, and politics in digital conversational spaces. …

Caroline Sinders is a critical designer and artist. For the past few years, she has been examining the intersections of artificial intelligence, abuse, and politics in digital conversational spaces. She has worked with the United Nations, Amnesty International, IBM Watson, the Wikimedia Foundation and others.

Sinders has held fellowships with the Harvard Kennedy School, Google's PAIR (People and Artificial Intelligence Research group), the Mozilla Foundation, Pioneer Works, Eyebeam, Ars Electronica, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Sci Art Resonances program with the European Commission, and the International Center of Photography. Currently, she is a fellow with Ars Electronica AI Lab with the Edinburgh Futures Institute and a visiting fellow with the Weizenbaum Institute looking at labor and systems in AI and platforms. Her work has been featured in the Tate Exchange in Tate Modern, Victoria and Albert Museum, MoMA PS1, LABoral, Wired, Slate, Quartz, the Channels Festival and others. Sinders holds a Masters from New York University's Interactive Telecommunications Program.

Constant Dullaart

[1]
Constant Dullaart‘s (Netherlands, 1979) practice reflects on the broad cultural and social effects of communication and image processing technologies, from performatively distributing artificial …

Constant Dullaart‘s (Netherlands, 1979) practice reflects on the broad cultural and social effects of communication and image processing technologies, from performatively distributing artificial social capital on social media to completing a staff-pick Kickstarter campaign for a hardware start-up called Dulltech™. His work includes websites, performances, routers, installations, startups, armies, and manipulated found images, frequently juxtaposing or consolidating technically dichotomized presentation realms.

D

Daniel Palmer

[1]
Dr Daniel Palmer is Associate Professor in the Art History and Theory Program and Associate Dean of Graduate Research in the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture at Monash University.

Dr Daniel Palmer is Associate Professor in the Art History and Theory Program and Associate Dean of Graduate Research in the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture at Monash University. Palmer's research and professional practice focuses on photography, contemporary art and digital media. His book publications include Photography and Collaboration: From Conceptual Art to Crowdsourcing (Bloomsbury 2017); Digital Light (Open Humanities Press 2015), edited with Sean Cubitt and Nathaniel Tkacz; The Culture of Photography in Public Space (Intellect 2015), edited with Anne Marsh and Melissa Miles; Twelve Australian Photo Artists (Piper Press, 2009), co-authored with Blair French; and Photogenic (Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2005).

Danny Birchall

[1]
Danny Birchall works in London for Wellcome Collection, where he commissions and edits digital projects.

Danny Birchall works in London for Wellcome Collection, where he commissions and edits digital projects. He is the co-curator of the forthcoming War of Nerves exhibition at the Wende Museum in Los Angeles.

David Raymond Conroy

[1]
David Raymond Conroy (b. 1978 Reading) is an artist that lives and works in Brussels and London.

David Raymond Conroy’s compositional works investigate the performance and construction of subjectivity within shared social space. Utilising commercial display strategies, museological structures and theatrical staging techniques, Conroy assembles objects, texts and images that position the rhetorics of quality and function in relation to desire. Central to his practice is the complex interweaving of production and consumption, how authenticity meets artifice in the formation of the self, and how that self relates to its community.
Conroy presented major projects at the Museum of Contemporary Art Estonia, and Seventeen gallery, London, in 2015. Other recent exhibitions have taken place at the Zabludowicz Collection; Modern Art Oxford; Young Projects, Los Angeles; Arnolfini, Bristol; Nottingham Contemporary; Chisenhale Gallery, London and Focal Point, Southend-on-Sea.
David Raymond Conroy (b.1978 Reading) lives and works in Brussels and London.

Dhruv Jani

[1]
Dhruv Jani is an author and artist at an independent game studio called Oleomingus.

Dhruv Jani is an author and artist at an independent game studio called Oleomingus.

He practises at the intersection of post-colonial writing, speculative architecture, and interactive-fiction, with a focus on histories occluded by colonial authority and violence; And he explores the use of videogames spaces as possible sites of protest and reparation.

Disnovation

[1]
DISNOVATION.ORG is both an art collective and an international workgroup engaged in the crossovers between contemporary arts, research and hacking.

Founded in 2012 by Nicolas Maigret and Maria Roszkowska, artist and philosopher Baruch Gottlieb joined the collective in 2018. Together, they develop situations of interference, debate and speculation that question dominant techno-positivist ideologies in order to foster post-growth narratives. Their research is expressed through installations, performances, websites and events. They recently co-edited A Bestiary of the Anthropocene, an atlas of anthropic hybrid creatures, and The Pirate Book, an anthology about pirated cultural content.

Their work has been presented at numerous art centers and festivals internationally such as Centre Pompidou (Paris), Transmediale (Berlin), the Museum of Art and Design (New York), Palais de Tokyo (Paris), FILE (Sao Paulo), ZKM (Karlsruhe), Strelka Institute (Moscow), ISEA (Hong Kong), Elektra (Montréal), China Museum of Digital Arts (Beijing), and the Chaos Computer Congress (Hamburg)… Their work has been featured in Forbes, Vice, Wired, Motherboard, Libération, Die Zeit, Arte TV, Next Nature, Hyperallergic, Le Temps, Neural.it, Digicult, Gizmodo, Seattle Weekly, torrentfreak.com, and Filmmaker Magazine among others.

Doreen A. Ríos

[1]
Doreen A. Ríos is an independent curator, lecturer and researcher specialised in digital culture.

Doreen A. Ríos is an independent curator, lecturer and researcher specialized in digital culture.
She holds an MA in Contemporary Curation from the University of Southampton, and a BA in Architecture from Tecnológico de Monterrey. Ríos is also the founder of [ANTI]MATERIA, a platform that aims to facilitate international exchanges between art professionals interested in digital practices as well as researching digital creative practices. As part of [ANTI]MATERIA she has curated several shows in Mexico and in the UK. Her work focuses on research and curation of digital art, new materialities, and post-digital practices. She’s currently the Chief Curator of the Digital Culture Centre in Mexico City, she also lectures at the BA in Digital Arts and at the MA in Visual Studies at the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México.
www.anti-materia.org

Dr Loplop

[1]
Dr Loplop is a London-based cat photographer and internet celebrity.

Dr Loplop is a London-based cat photographer and internet celebrity. He is best known as the originator of the 'Somebody else's cat' phenomenon, and is an administrator of the eponymous Flickr group. His other interests include architecture, design and web development.

E

EFTD

[1]
EFTD (Embassy for the Displaced) is a faux-institution established between London, Athens, and the Aegean archipelago.

EFTD (Embassy for the Displaced) is a faux-institution established between London, Athens, and the Aegean archipelago. The collective operates as an espace autre, a lateral space at -and against- the frontiers of Citadel Europe, and articulates its work through theory, spacial practice and activism.

Erica Scourti

[1]
Erica Scourti is an artist and writer, based in Athens and London

Erica Scourti is an artist and writer, based in Athens and London Her work in text, video and performance has been shown recently at Hayward Gallery Project Space, Munich Kunstverein, Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens, Banner Repeater and The Royal Standard. Upcoming exhibitions include Group Therapy at FACT, Poetics and Politics of Data at HEK Basel and a residency at Wysing Arts Centre.

Everest Pipkin

[2]
Everest Pipkin is a drawing and software artist currently based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Everest Pipkin is a drawing and software artist currently based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who produces intimate work with large data sets. Through the use of online archives, big data repositories, and other resources for digital information, they aim to reclaim the corporate internet as a space that can be gentle, ecological, and personal.

F

Fei-Fei Li

[1]
Dr. Fei-Fei Li is the inventor of ImageNet and the ImageNet Challenge, a critical large-scale dataset and benchmarking effort that has contributed to the latest developments in deep learning and AI. …

Fei-Fei Li is the inaugural Sequoia Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and co-director of Stanford’s Human-Centered AI Institute. She served as the Director of Stanford’s AI Lab from 2013 to 2018. During her sabbatical from Stanford from 2017-2018, she was Vice President at Google and served as Chief Scientist of AI/ML at Google Cloud. She joined Stanford in 2009 as an assistant professor and was on faculty at Princeton University (2007-2009), and University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (2005-2006).
Dr. Li is the inventor of ImageNet and the ImageNet Challenge, a critical large-scale dataset and benchmarking effort that has contributed to the latest developments in deep learning and AI. In addition to her technical contributions, she is a national leading voice for advocating diversity in STEM and AI. She is co-founder and chairperson of the national non-profit AI4ALL aimed at increasing inclusion and diversity in AI education. Dr. Fei-Fei Li’s main research areas are in machine learning, deep learning, computer vision and cognitive and computational neuroscience. She has published nearly 200 scientific articles in top-tier journals and conferences. Dr. Li is a Fellow of ACM, a recipient of the 2019 IEEE PAMI Longuet-Higgins Prize, 2019 National Geographic Society Further Award, 2017 Athena Award for Academic Leadership, IAPR 2016 J.K. Aggarwal Prize, the 2016 IEEE PAMI Mark Everingham Award, the 2016 nVidia Pioneer in AI Award, 2014 IBM Faculty Fellow Award, 2011 Alfred Sloan Faculty Award, 2012 Yahoo Labs FREP award, 2009 NSF CAREER award, the 2006 Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellowship, among others. Dr. Fei-Fei Li obtained her B.A. degree in physics from Princeton with High Honors, and her PhD degree in electrical engineering from California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

Florian A. Schmidt

[1]
Florian A. Schmidt is a professor for Design and Media Theory at the University of Applied Sciences HTW Dresden.

Florian A. Schmidt is a professor for Design and Media Theory at the University of Applied Sciences HTW Dresden.
He holds a diploma in Communication Design from the Weissensee Academy of Art Berlin and a Ph.D. from the Royal College of Art in London. His doctoral thesis 'Crowd Design' (Birkhäuser, 2017)is an analysis of the crowdsourcing of design as well as the design of crowdsourcing.
He has published widely on the intersection of design, digital media and the future of work. His latest research reports are: Digital Labour Markets in the Platform Economy (FES, 2016); Gig Work in Berlin (City of Berlin, 2017); and Crowdsourced Production of AI Training Data (HBS, 2019). He was a speaker at conferences such as the Digital Labor Conference in New York, Reshaping Work in Amsterdam, transmediale and re:publica in Berlin. He has consulted committees on digital labour and the platform economy at the Deutsche Bundestag in Berlin as well as the EU in Brussels.

Frances Lingard

[1]
Frances Lingard is a creative technologist and researcher based in Glasgow, working with websites, games and CGI.

Frances Lingard is a creative technologist and researcher based in Glasgow, working with websites, games and CGI. Their current research involves AI governance, data rights and resistance, disinformation and the development of local/'slow' technologies. Frances works on projects with the Scottish Children's Parliament researching the impact of AI development and use on children's lives in Scotland. They founded and run 'For Starters' a Critical Coding Club based out of the CCA, Glasgow. They have exhibited at Arebyte Gallery (London), The Royal Scottish Academy (Scotland), Mirabel Studios (Manchester) and Primary (Nottingham).

Francis Gooding

[1]
Francis Gooding works with music, art and film.

Francis Gooding works with music, art and film. His writing appears in The Wire and the London Review of Books, and his collaborative work with Noah Angell, Ghost Stories of the British Museum, is currently showing at Rib, Rotterdam until December 2017.

G

Gaia Tedone

[1]
Gaia Tedone is a curator and researcher with an expansive interest in the technologies of image formation and online curatorial practices.

Gaia Tedone is a curator and researcher with an expansive interest in the technologies of image formation and online curatorial practices. She holds an MFA in Curating from Goldsmiths College, London (2008) and was a Curatorial Fellow of the Whitney Independent Study Programme, New York (2011). Gaia is completing her PhD at the Centre for the Study of the Networked Image, London South Bank University with a practice-based research entitled ‘Curating The Networked Image: Circulation, Commodification, Computation’. Her project explores the increasingly hybrid understanding of the curatorial function online, as shaped by the convergence of different professional fields and in light of existing conditions of online image searching, reproduction and circulation. Her recent publications on the topic include: Networked Co-Curation: An Exploration of the Socio-Technical Specificities of Online Curation with Annet Dekker, Arts 2019, 8(3), 86; Human-Algorithmic Curation: Curating with or against the Algorithm? Conference Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Computation, Communication, Aesthetics & X, Milan, Fabbrica del Vapore, July 2019; Tracing Networked Images: an Emerging Method for Online Curation, Journal of Media Practice, 2017, 18:1, 51-62.

Geoff Cox

[1]
Geoff Cox is Associate Professor in the School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus University (DK).

Geoff Cox is Associate Professor in the School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus University (DK), currently engaged on a 3 year research project The Contemporary Condition funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research (with Jacob Lund), and from January 2017, is Reader in Fine Art at Plymouth University (UK). He recently published (with Jacob Lund) The Contemporary Condition: Introductory Thoughts on Contemporaneity and Contemporary Art, as the first in a new series of small co-edited books published by Sternberg Press. With Christian Ulrik Andersen, he co-runs a yearly workshop/publication in collaboration with transmediale festival in Berlin and is co-editor of the associated open access online journal APRJA. With Alex McLean, he wrote Speaking Code: coding as aesthetic and political expression (MIT Press 2013), and amongst other things is currently working on a multi-authored book project about live coding. 

Giacomo Mercuriali

[0]
Giacomo Mercuriali is an artist, writer and independent scholar with an interest in image theory and iconology.

Giacomo Mercuriali is an artist, writer and independent scholar with an interest in image theory and iconology. He holds a MA in Art History and Criticism. He attended the PhD School in Philosophy at the University of Milano, supported by a national grant. He spent research periods at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. He teaches Cultural Anthropology at the Accademia di Belle Arti G. Carrara in Bergamo. His work has appeared in NERO, Journal of Digital Art History, and Visual History, amongst others.

Gretta Louw

[1]
Gretta Louw is a South African-born Australian artist, writer, and curator whose practice explores the potential of art as a means of investigating psycho-social and cultural phenomena, particularly …

Gretta Louw is a South African-born Australian artist, writer, and curator whose practice explores the potential of art as a means of investigating psycho-social and cultural phenomena, particularly in relation to digital technologies and the internet. She received her BA in 2001 from the University of Western Australia and Honours in Psychology in 2002, subsequently living in Japan and New Zealand before moving to Germany in 2007. Her work has been exhibited widely - in New York, Berlin, Jakarta, London, and Tel Aviv, amongst others - including in a number of public institutions such as the Kunstmuseum Solothurn, Stadtgalerie Mannheim, and Kunstverein Ludwigshafen. In 2012 she released her first book, Controlling_Connectivity: Art, Psychology, and the Internet, followed in 2013 by Warnayaka Art Centre: Art in the Digital Desert, and in 2014 her first catalogue Works 2011-2014 / Arbeiten 2011-2014. She lives and works in Germany and Australia.

H

Heather Dewey-Hagborg

[1]
Heather Dewey-Hagborg is a transdisciplinary artist and educator who is interested in art as research and critical practice. Her controversial biopolitical art practice includes the project Stranger …

Heather Dewey-Hagborg is a transdisciplinary artist and educator who is interested in art as research and critical practice. Her controversial biopolitical art practice includes the project Stranger Visions in which she created portrait sculptures from analyses of genetic material (hair, cigarette butts, chewed up gum) collected in public places.
Heather has shown work internationally at events and venues including the World Economic Forum, the Daejeon Biennale, the Guangzhou Triennial, and the Shenzhen Urbanism and Architecture Biennale, the Van Abbemuseum, Transmediale and PS1 MOMA. Her work is held in public collections of the Centre Pompidou, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the New York Historical Society, among others, and has been widely discussed in the media, from the New York Times and the BBC to Art Forum and Wired.
Heather has a PhD in Electronic Arts from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She is an artist fellow at AI Now, an Artist-in-Residence at the Exploratorium, as well as Science Center, and is an affiliate of Data & Society.
She is also a co-founder and co-curator of REFRESH, an inclusive and politically engaged collaborative platform at the intersection of Art, Science, and Technology.

J

James Bridle

[1]
James Bridle is a British artist and writer based in Athens, Greece.

James Bridle is a British artist and writer based in Athens, Greece. His artworks have been commissioned by galleries and institutions and exhibited worldwide and on the internet. His writing on literature, culture and networks has appeared in magazines and newspapers including Wired, Domus, Cabinet, the Atlantic, the New Statesman, the Guardian, the Observer and many others, in print and online. He lectures regularly at conferences, universities, and other events. His formulation of the New Aesthetic research project has spurred debate and creative work across multiple disciplines. His work can be found at http://booktwo.org.

Jennifer Gabrys

[1]
Jennifer Gabrys is Chair in Media, Culture and Environment in the Department of Sociology at the University of Cambridge. She leads the Planetary Praxis research group and is Principal Investigator …

Jennifer Gabrys is Chair in Media, Culture and Environment in the Department of Sociology at the University of Cambridge. She leads the Planetary Praxis research group and is Principal Investigator on the ERC-funded project, Smart Forests: Transforming Environments into Social-Political Technologies, which launched the research platform Smart Forests Atlas in 2022. She also leads the Citizen Sense and AirKit projects, which investigate the use of environmental sensors for new modes of citizen involvement in environmental issues. Both of these projects have received funding from the European Research Council.

Her most recent book on the Citizen Sense project, Citizens of Worlds: Open-Air Toolkits for Environmental Struggle, was published November 2022 by the University of Minnesota Press, and is available as an open-access publication on Manifold.

She occasionally tweets through @citizen_sense and @PlanetaryPraxis.

Jeremy Keenan

[1]
Jeremy Keenan creates artworks using motion, sound, feedback, data, and light. He works with real and imaginary signals, audible and inaudible feedback, and the uncanny reconfiguration of familiar …

Jeremy Keenan creates artworks using motion, sound, feedback, data, and light. He works with real and imaginary signals, audible and inaudible feedback, and the uncanny reconfiguration of familiar tools like speakers, screens, lamps and microphones, discovering the latent possibilities within their sensory domain.

www.jeremykeenan.info

Jessica Wilson

[1]
Jessica Wilson makes computer-generated animations, installations, and 3D-rendered flat works with sensitivity to the somatic and material effects of phantasmal or virtual systems.

Jessica Wilson makes computer-generated animations, installations, and 3D-rendered flat works with sensitivity to the somatic and material effects of phantasmal or virtual systems.

Recent solo and group exhibitions include Tallinn Photomonth 23, Tallinn Estonia (2023), “Perfectly Clear” with Kai Matsumiya, Basel, Switzerland (2023), “The Painters New Tools” Nahmad Contemporary, New York (2022); “Under the Hood” Riga Technoculture Research Unit, Riga, Latvia (2022); “Screen Series: Jessica Wilson”, New Museum, New York (2020), “Not Normally at Rest,” Page (NYC), New York (2020); and “Faulty Bulb,” Crush Curatorial, New York (2019). Her works have been included in screenings and film festivals including at Callie’s, Berlin (2023), International Film Festival, Rotterdam (2020); Global Anesthetics, Athens, Greece (2019); Art Metropole at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Toronto, Canada (2019); and Pioneer Works, New York (2018). She is a resident artist for 2023-24 at the Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Joana Moll

[3]
Joana Moll is an artist and researcher based in Barcelona.

Joana Moll is an artist and researcher based in Barcelona. Her work critically explores the way post-capitalist narratives affect the alphabetization of machines, humans and ecosystems. Her main research topics include environmental impact of communication technologies, Internet infrastructures, surveillance and language. She has presented her work in several venues and publications around the world. Furthermore, she is a member of the transdisciplinary research project Antiatlas des Frontières and co-founder of The Institute for the Advancement of popular automatisms.  Currently she is a researcher in residence at HANGAR and a visiting lecturer at VIT lab in Vic, Barcelona. Her work is available at janavirgin.com.

Joanna Zylinska

[2]
Joanna Zylinska is an artist, writer, curator, and Professor of Media Philosophy + Critical Digital Practice at King’s College London.

Joanna Zylinska is an artist, writer, curator, and Professor of Media Philosophy + Critical Digital Practice at King’s College London. She is an author of a number of books, including AI Art: Machine Visions and Warped Dreams(Open Humanities Press, 2020) and Nonhuman Photography (MIT Press, 2017). Her art practice involves experimenting with different kinds of image-based media. She is currently researching perception and cognition as boundary zones between human and machine intelligence, while trying to answer the question: 'Does photography have a future?'

Joanne McNeil

[2]
Joanne McNeil is a writer interested in the ways that technology is shaping art, politics, and society.

Joanne McNeil is a writer interested in the ways that technology is shaping art, politics, and society. She was a digital arts writing fellow at the Thomas Art Foundation and an artist-in-residence at Eyebeam. She is currently writing a book about internet culture.

Joel McKim

[1]
Joel McKim is Senior Lecturer in Digital Media and Culture and the Director of the Vasari Research Centre for Art and Technology at Birkbeck, University of London.

Joel McKim is Senior Lecturer in Digital Media and Culture and the Director of the Vasari Research Centre for Art and Technology at Birkbeck, University of London. He is interested in the history and theory of computational images, contemporary digital animation, and the impact of new technologies on art, architecture and design. He is the author of Architecture, Media and Memory: Facing Complexity in Post-9/11 New York (2018) and was recently a visiting research fellow at the V&A working on a project entitled “A Prehistory of Machine Vision” involving the museum’s Computer Art Collections.

Joey Holder

[1]
Joey Holder’s artistic practice and research raises philosophical questions of our universe and things yet unknown, regarding the future of science, medicine, biology and human-machine interactions.

Joey Holder lives and works in London and Nottingham, UK. Holder’s artistic practice and research raises philosophical questions of our universe and things yet unknown, regarding the future of science, medicine, biology and human-machine interactions. Working with scientific and technical experts she makes immersive, multi-media installations that explore the limits of the human and how we experience non-human, natural and technological forms. Mixing elements of biology, nanotechnology and natural history against computer programme interfaces, screen savers and measuring devices, she suggests the impermanence and inter-changeability of these apparently contrasting and oppositional worlds: ‘everything is a mutant and a hybrid’. Recent exhibitions include ‘Ophiux’, Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridge (2016), ‘TETRAGRAMMATON’, LD50, London (duo w/ John Russell) (2016), ‘Lament of Ur’, Karst, Plymouth (duo w/ Viktor Timofeev) (2015); ‘BioStat.’, Project Native Informant, London (2015) and ‘HYDROZOAN’, The Royal Standard, Liverpool (2014).

Jon Sneyers

[1]
Dr. Jon Sneyers researches image processing and image compression at Cloudinary, and is the co-creator of the FLIF and JPEG XL image formats.

Dr. Jon Sneyers researches image processing and image compression at Cloudinary, a company providing cloud-based image and video management services to a million web developers at thousands of companies. He is the co-creator of the FLIF and JPEG XL image formats, and is currently chair of the JPEG XL Adhoc Group within the JPEG committee as well as an editor of the ISO/IEC 18181 standard (JPEG XL).

Jon Uriarte

[1]
Jon Uriarte is curator of the Digital Programme at The Photographers’ Gallery.

Jon Uriarte is curator of the Digital Programme at The Photographers’ Gallery. He has previously curated Getxophoto International Image Festival and DONE, a programme about the role of the image on the post-digital era launched by Foto Colectania.

Julian Stallabrass

[1]
Julian Stallabrass a lecturer, writer, photographer and curator with a particular interest in the relations between art and political issues.

Julian Stallabrass a lecturer, writer, photographer and curator with a particular interest in the relations between art and political issues. His research and teaching is in areas of modern and contemporary art, including the globalisation of art and the biennial scene, the history of photography and new media art. Most recently, he has been working on documentary photography, film and video, especially in the depiction of war. He has also been researching populism in contemporary art and politics.

Jussi Parikka

[1]
Professor Jussi Parikka is a Finnish media theorist who works at the Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton.

Professor Jussi Parikka is a Finnish media theorist who works at the Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton. Parikka is also the director of the new research group, AMT – short for Archaeologies of Media and Technology. He has written on media archaeology, network culture and contemporary media arts and his most recent books include: A Geology of Media (2015), the 2nd updated edition of Digital Contagions: A Media Archaeology of Computer Viruses (2016) and the co-edited volume Across and Beyond: a transmediale Reader on Post-Digital Practices, Concepts and Institutions (2016). More information at jussiparikka.net/.

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Katrina Sluis

[1]
Katrina Sluis is Curator (Digital Programmes) at The Photographers’ Gallery.

Katrina Sluis is Curator (Digital Programmes) at The Photographers’ Gallery and Senior Lecturer at London South Bank University where she is a founding Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of the Networked Image.

Kyveli Mavrokordopoulou

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Kyveli Mavrokordopoulou is a historian of modern and contemporary art, specializing in the relationship between art and science with an emphasis on nuclear technologies.

Kyveli Mavrokordopoulou is a historian of modern and contemporary art, specializing in the relationship between art and science with an emphasis on nuclear technologies. She was awarded her PhD from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris (2021), supported by an Onassis Foundation scholarship, with a dissertation entitled “Dwelling, Extracting, Burying. Nuclear Imaginaries in Contemporary Art (1970–2020)”. Currently, she is the scientific advisor of the first survey exhibition on the atomic age at the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris (October 2024) and a research fellow and lecturer at VU University Amsterdam. Her work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Transbordeur, Environmental Humanities and Camera Austria International, amongst others.

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Laura Marks

[1]
Laura U. Marks works on media art and philosophy with an intercultural focus and an emphasis on appropriate technologies.

Laura U. Marks works on media art and philosophy with an intercultural focus and an emphasis on appropriate technologies. Her fifth book, The Fold: From Your Body to the Cosmos, is forthcoming from Duke University Press. A co-founder of the Substantial Motion Research Network, Marks founded the Small File Media Festival and leads the research group Tackling the Carbon Footprint of Streaming Media. She programs experimental media art for venues around the world. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Marks teaches in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. www.sfu.ca/lmarks.

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Maria/Rosario Montero

[1]
Maria/Rosario Montero is an artist and founder of the Border Agency Art Collective.

Maria/Rosario Montero is an artist and founder of the Border Agency Art Collective. She holds an MFA from the University of Chile and an MSc in Digital Anthropology from University College London and has exhibited widely in Chile, China, Mexico, Italy, Spain, UK and Venezuela. Her work was part of the selection of contemporary Chilean photographers for 02/CNCA (2010) and C Photo edition, “New Latin Look” curated by Martin Parr (2012). She is currently finishing a PhD in Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths College. Her thesis title is ' Decolonising Photographic Landscapes. A Visual Engagement with Chilean Gardens'

Marloes de Valk

[3]
Marloes de Valk is a software artist, writer, PhD researcher at the Centre for the Study of the Networked Image and thesis supervisor at Experimental Publishing at Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam.

Marloes de Valk (NL) is a software artist and writer in the post-despair stage of coping with the threat of global warming and being spied on by the devices surrounding her. Surprised by the obsessive dedication with which we, even post-Snowden, share intimate details about ourselves to an often not too clearly defined group of others, astounded by the deafening noise we generate while socializing with the technology around us, she is looking to better understand why.
She is a PhD researcher at the Centre for the Study of the Networked Image at London South Bank University, in collaboration with The Photographer's Gallery, looking into the material and social impact of the networked image on the climate crisis, with special attention to the entanglements between greenwashing - the misdirection of attention and efforts in tackling the crisis - and the increasing energy and resource consumption associated with the circulation of networked images. Typical of those in the post-despair stage, she experiments with sustainable ways of publishing her findings.
Marloes is a thesis supervisor at the master Experimental Publishing at Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam. She has participated in exhibitions internationally, teaches workshops, gives lectures (a.o. at Transmediale and Chaos Communication Congress) and has published articles on Free/Libre/Open Source Software, free culture, art and technology (a.o. in the Contemporary Music Review and Artnodes). In 2018 she was the winner of the Hash Award, an international production award granted by ZKM and Akademie Schloss Solitude. As a member of artist collective GOTO10, she has helped develop the puredyne GNU/Linux distribution and Make Art festival. Together with Aymeric Mansoux she is editor of the publication FLOSS+Art, published early 2009. She is part of Plutonian Corp., La Société Anonyme and Iodine dynamics.

Martin Zeilinger

[1]
Martin Zeilinger is a London-based new media researcher, practitioner, and curator. His work focuses in part on the societal and cultural impact of emerging financial technologies, such as blockchain …

Martin Zeilinger is a London-based new media researcher, practitioner, and curator. His work focuses in part on the societal and cultural impact of emerging financial technologies, such as blockchain and cryptocurrencies. More information on these topics is available through MoneyLab UK, an international event bringing together artists, activists, and theorists working on these issues, which Martin organised at Somerset House, London, in early 2018. Martin currently serves as Senior Lecturer in Media at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, and is curator of the Toronto-based Vector Media Art Festival.

Max Ardito

[1]
Max Ardito is a composer and researcher who studies signal processing, mathematics, media theory, and the history of technology. Currently he lives in Montréal where he’s a member of the Centre for …

Max Ardito is a composer and researcher who studies signal processing, mathematics, media theory, and the history of technology. Currently he lives in Montréal where he’s a member of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music Media and Technology (CIRMMT), and McGill University's Sound Processing and Control Lab (SPCL). His academic work centers around various applications of time-frequency analysis, wavelet scattering, group theory, and representation theory to both music composition and computational musicology. During the summer, he teaches a Max/MSP/Jitter course in Paris at l'Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique (IRCAM) on computer music composition and electronic music history. In Brooklyn—where he was born and raised—he’s one of the founders of synth manufacturer, community space, and experimental music venue CuteLab. 

Milagros Miceli

[1]
Milagros Miceli is a sociologist and computer scientist. Her research explores how ground-truth data for machine learning is produced.

Milagros Miceli is a sociologist and computer scientist. Her research explores how ground-truth data for machine learning is produced. She focuses on labor conditions and power dynamics in data generation and labeling, exploring questions of meaning-making, knowledge production, and symbolic power within machine learning data. Dr. Miceli leads the research group “Data, Algorithmic Systems, and Ethics“ at the Weizenbaum Institute. She is also a researcher at the DAIR Institute, where she actively engages communities of data workers in AI research.

Mónica Alcázar-Duarte

[1]
Mónica Alcázar-Duarte is a Mexican-British multi-disciplinary visual artist whose work acknowledges her indigenous heritage while exploring current ideals of progress.

Mónica Alcázar-Duarte is a Mexican-British multi-disciplinary visual artist whose work acknowledges her indigenous heritage while exploring current ideals of progress. Migration, with the uneasiness that derives from it, and a need for equality, all play an important role in her work. Her projects are, at some level, acts of survival. A personal attempt to intervene with current practices of representation that grows into a need to engage with the public. 

Anchored to meticulous research, her work contributes to contemporary thought on social, political, and cultural issues. 

"In our ever-shifting world, in the midst of an ecological disaster, a sense of being at a tipping point has created an acute awareness for many. Transition, participation and need for equality are the core motivations of Monica’s mostly long-term projects. Interaction and participation with the public are indispensable to force a reflection around processes of interpretation, and become an intrinsic ground of her thinking and research path.
Aware that in the current fluid world, the only constant element is change, one aspect remains still throughout: the personal as a driving force to activate the collective. What, intimately keeps her going is to find and create ways of making ourselves, as a community, an active force that works towards a better society.
Monica’s creative thinking confronts current issues using photography, science and cutting edge technology and projects them onto socio-political scenarios, focusing on the ethics of image making, and the tension between images, context and ideology." Text written by Maria Teresa Salvati My Spot of Beauty - C41 Magazine

Morehshin Allahyari

[1]
Morehshin Allahyari is an artist whose work deals with the political, social, and cultural contradictions we face every day.

Morehshin Allahyari is an artist born and raised in Iran and now based in the United States.

Her work deals with the political, social, and cultural contradictions we face every day. She thinks about technology as a philosophical toolset to reflect on objects and as a poetic means to document our personal and collective lives struggles in the 21st century.

Morehshin is the co-author of The 3D Additivist Cookbook in collaboration with writer/artist Daniel Rourke, published on December 2016 online in 3DPDF format and in print by the Institute of Networked Cultures. Her modeled, 3D-printed sculptural reconstructions of ancient artifacts destroyed by ISIS, titled Material Speculation: ISIS, have received widespread curatorial and press attention and have been exhibited worldwide.

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Natalie D Kane

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Natalie Kane is a writer, curator and researcher working at the intersection of digital culture, futures and design.

Natalie Kane is a writer, curator and researcher working at the intersection of digital culture, futures and design. She is Curator at FutureEverything, an innovation lab for digital culture in Manchester, UK, Co-curator of Haunted Machines with Tobias Revell, and holds a research position at post-national futures lab Changeist, NL.

Nestor Sire

[4]
Nestor Siré's artistic practice intervenes directly in specific contexts in order to analyse social and cultural phenomena.

Nestor Siré's artistic practice intervenes directly in specific contexts in order to analyse social and cultural phenomena. His artistic methodology consists in expanding social structures in such a way as to find more effective ways through which art can intervene in the complex relationships between official and informal networks. More specifically, the idiosyncrasies of digital culture in the Cuban context; focuses on unofficial methods for circulating information and goods, such as alternative forms of economic production, and phenomena resulting from social creativity.

His works have been shown in the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes (Havana), Queens Museum (New York), Rhizome (New York), New Museum (New York), Hong-Gah Museum (Taipei), Museo de Arte Contemporáneo (Mexico City), Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, Santa Fe (Argentina), among other places. He has participated in events such as the Manifesta 13 Biennial (France), Gwangju Biennale (South Korea), Curitiba Biennial (Brazil), the Havana Biennial (Cuba) and the Asunción International Biennale (Paraguay), the Festival of New Latin American Cinema in Cuba and the Oberhausen International Festival of Short Film (Germany).

Nicolas Malevé

[4]
Visual artist, computer programmer and data activist. Lives and works between Brussels and London.

Visual artist, computer programmer and data activist. Lives and works between Brussels and London. Nicolas completed a Phd thesis on the algorithms of vision at the London South Bank University. He is a member of Constant and the Scandinavian Institute for Computational Vandalism. In the Active Archives project, with Michael Murtaugh, he is experimenting with techniques to engage with large collections of visual materials and explore different ways to navigate and question them.

Nika Sandler

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Nika Sandler is a visual artist who explores themes related to the human and non-human gaze and post-photography.

Nika Sandler is a visual artist who explores themes related to the human and non-human gaze and post-photography.

Nye Thompson

[1]
Nye Thompson is a London-based visual artist and software designer.

Nye Thompson is a London-based visual artist and software designer. Nye’s artwork explores the way new technology paradigms are transforming our humanity and the social/psychological impact of living in a world of connected objects. Working primarily in sculptural installation she uses the virtual and material artefacts of technology to explore the relationship between the embodied and virtual experience.
Since the beginning of 2016 she has been documenting the global phenomenon of self-surveillance through her online/offline project Backdoored which collects images taken by bots through unsecured security cameras. This work was first shown in Tate Modern and then as a solo show Backdoored.io and attracted worldwide media coverage, including BBC Click, C4 news, CNN Hong Kong, NOS, the Guardian and Wired.

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Olga Goriunova

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Olga Goriunova is is a Senior Lecturer in the Media Arts Department, Royal Holloway, University of London.

Olga Goriunova is a Senior Lecturer in the Media Arts Department, Royal Holloway, University of London. She is the author of 'Art Platforms and Cultural Production on the Internet' (Routledge, 2012) and the curator of 'Fun and Software' exhibition (Arnolfini - Baltan, 2010-2011).

open-weather

[1]
Open-weather is a feminist experiment in imaging and imagining the earth and its weather systems using DIY community tools led by Sophie Dyer and Sasha Engelmann.

Co-led by researcher-designer Sophie Dyer and creative geographer Sasha Engelmann, open-weather encompasses a series of how-to guides, critical frameworks and public workshops on the reception of satellite images using free or inexpensive amateur radio technologies. In the tradition of intersectional feminism, open-weather investigates the politics of location and interlocking oppressions that shape our capacities to observe, negotiate, and respond to the climate crisis. In doing so, open-weather challenges dominant representations of earth and environment while complicating ideas of the weather beyond the meteorological.

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Padmini Ray Murray

[1]
Padmini Ray Murray (PhD, University of Edinburgh) is the founder of Design Beku.: a collective that emerged from a desire to explore how technology and design can be decolonial, local, and ethical.

Padmini Ray Murray (PhD, University of Edinburgh) is the founder of Design Beku.: a collective that emerged from a desire to explore how technology and design can be decolonial, local, and ethical.

Padmini established the first degree level digital humanities programme in India at the Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology where she was course director from 2016-2018. She was the recipient of the Arts and Humanities Research Council Unbox Fellowship (2012-13) and the co-investigator with Claire Squires on The Book Unbound, also funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. She is currently co-investigator on Gendering the Smart City with Professor Ayona Dutta, and the digital lead on Two Centuries of Indian Print, a project in collaboration with the British Library and Jadavpur University. She served as a trustee for Wikimedia UK from 2013-2014, and led a research project on platform governance and design for the Ekstep Foundation in 2018.

As a creative practitioner, Padmini creates new media work which reflects her research and interests, such as Darshan Diversion (with KV Ketan and Joel Johnson), a feminist videogame about the Sabarimala temple controversy (2016); Halt The Hate (with Pratyush Raman) an interactive database of crimes against minorities for Amnesty India (2017) and is currently working on Visualising Cybersecurity – a Hewlett funded project that aims to alter how cybersecurity is depicted and discussed in the media (with the Centre for Internet and Society and Paulanthony George), and A is for AI: A Dictionary of AI (with Pratyush Raman, 2020). Padmini’s most recent published work focuses on how corporate online space, commit and perpetuate epistemological violence against the marginalised, through collusions of infrastructure and the interface.

Paolo Cirio

[1]
Paolo Cirio is a conceptual artist and an activist that engages with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society.

Paolo Cirio is a conceptual artist and an activist that engages with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. His works investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, politics and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has had solo shows at International Kunstverein Luxemburg, 2016; NOME gallery, Berlin, 2015; Bellegard Centre Culturel, Toulouse, 2015; Kasa Gallery, Istanbul, Turkey, 2013; Aksioma Institute for Contemporary Art, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2013 and 2011. He has won a number of awards, including Golden Nica first prize at Ars Electronica in 2013; the Eyebeam Fellowship in 2012; Transmediale second prize 2008, among others. He has also curated at Fridman Gallery, NYC, 2017; Eyebeam, NYC, 2013, and at the Kitchen, NYC, 2012. He regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading art festivals and universities worldwide and his projects could be found at paolocirio.net

Philipp Schmitt

[2]
Philipp Schmitt is an artist, designer, and researcher based in Brooklyn, NY, USA. His practice engages with the philosophical, poetic, and political dimensions of computation.

Philipp Schmitt is an artist, designer, and researcher based in Brooklyn, NY, USA. His practice engages with the philosophical, poetic, and political dimensions of computation. His current work addresses notions of opacity in artificial intelligence research and its history.

Philipp’s work has been exhibited at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the MAK Vienna, Science Gallery Dublin, Link Art Center, and the Triennale di Milano, and is part of the permanent collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Ars Electronica Center and the MoMA Art Library. His artist book, Computed Curation, was published by Bromide Publishing House in 2018.
Currently, Philipp is a Berggruen Institute Junior Artist Fellow with Yann LeCun at NYU Center for Data Science, and a metaLAB Affiliate at Harvard University.

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Sabrina Starnaman

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Sabrina Starnaman researches socially-engaged literature, particularly around women’s activism, urbanism, and disability that explores how activists remediated exploitative labor practices, racism, …

Sabrina Starnaman researches socially-engaged literature, particularly Progressive Era (1880-1930) American texts about women’s activism, urbanism, and disability that explores how activists remediated exploitative labor practices, racism, and poverty. Her work brings the voices of overlooked writers, particularly women writers, back into the public consciousness. Starnaman is an Associate Professor of Instruction of Literature and Director of Research for LabSynthE, a laboratory for synthetic, electronic poetry at the University of Texas at Dallas. xtine burrough and Sabrina Starnaman’s collaborations are accessible on VisibleWomen.net.

Sam Mercer

[2]
Sam Mercer is a producer of the digital programme at The Photographers' Gallery.

Sam Mercer is a producer of the digital programme at The Photographer's Gallery focusing on commissioning and curating the Media Wall. He is also an artist, primarily working with moving image, part of the Common Study artists' group. Recent projects include Interruptions, a browser extension with Field Broadcast and Bad Vibes Club as well as 'Nobody Must Realise', filmed around the Knaresborough Bed Race, Yorkshire. Between 2007 and 2013, he was a member of Nottingham artist group Tether, producing exhibitions, events and online projects.

Sarah Cook

[1]
Sarah Cook is a curator and professor in Information Studies at the University of Glasgow who has written about artists’ uses of AI.

Sarah Cook is a curator and professor in Information Studies at the University of Glasgow who has written about artists’ uses of AI.

Sebastian Schmieg

[2]
Sebastian Schmieg investigates the algorithmic circulation of images, texts, and bodies.

Sebastian Schmieg investigates the algorithmic circulation of images, texts, and bodies. He creates playful interventions that penetrate the shiny surfaces of our networked society and explore the realities that lie behind them. In particular Schmieg focuses on labor, algorithmic management, and artificial intelligence. He works in a wide range of media including video, website, installation, artist book, custom software, lecture performance, and delivery service. Schmieg’s work has been exhibited internationally at Kunsthalle Zürich, The Photographers’ Gallery London, MdbK Leipzig, HeK Basel, and Chronus Art Center Shanghai. He is a professor of Interface Design at the University of Applied Sciences HTW Dresden.

Shelby Shaw

[1]
Shelby Shaw is a multimedia writer and artist based in and around New York state. She works on objecthood and legacy in analogue formats, and is not on social media.

Shelby Shaw is a multimedia writer and artist based in and around New York state. Her work has been commissioned by or appeared via Artforum, The Believer, MIT List Visual Arts Center (MA), IFC Center (NY), Wendy's Subway (NY), Screen Slate, the Printed Matter Art Book Fair Archive, and more. Since 2015 she has been with the programming team for the avant-garde and artists' moving image section of the New York Film Festival, currently called Currents. Shelby works on objecthood and legacy in analogue formats, and is not on social media.

Simone C. Niquille

[1]
Simone C Niquille is a designer and researcher based in Amsterdam NL.

Simone C Niquille is a designer and researcher based in Amsterdam NL.
Her practice technoflesh investigates the representation of identity & the digitisation of biomass in the networked space of appearance. Currently she is working on a project on the domestic implications of machine vision as part of the Housing The Human initiative and researching the use of digital capture technology for evidence production with the long term project Parametric Truth. / technofle.sh

Sonia Bernac

[1]
Sonia Bernac is an AI technologist, artist and researcher investigating new synthetic beings, algorithmically clustered wisdom(s), murmurations of data and intuitions of science fiction. She pays …

Sonia Bernac is an AI technologist, artist and researcher investigating new synthetic beings, algorithmically clustered wisdom(s), murmurations of data and intuitions of science fiction. She pays particular attention to the emergence of pathological systemic forms: exclusionary, compulsive or sadistic imagining. 

Srujana Katta

[1]
Srujana Katta is a PhD researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford.

Srujana Katta is a PhD researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford. She researches labour organising and worker-centric futures of platform work in Hyderabad, India, using participatory and activist research methods. She is passionate about supporting and building community-based interventions and movements for just, equitable, and representative technological futures.

Steffen Köhn

[2]
Steffen Köhn is a filmmaker, anthropologist and video artist who uses ethnography to understand contemporary sociotechnical landscapes.

Steffen Köhn is a filmmaker, anthropologist and video artist who uses ethnography to understand contemporary sociotechnical landscapes. For his video- and installation works he engages in local collaborations with gig workers, software developers, or science fiction writers to explore viable alternatives to current distributions of technological access and arrangements of power.

His works have been shown at the Academy of the Arts Berlin, Kunsthaus Graz, Vienna Art Week, Hong Gah Museum Taipei, Lulea Biennial, and the ethnographic museums of Copenhagen and Dresden. His films have been screened (among others) at the Berlinale, Rotterdam International Film Festival, and the Word Film Festival Montreal.

Su Myat

[1]
Su Myat is passionate about gender equality and human rights. She has worked to empower women founders and workplace equality.

Su Myat is passionate about gender equality and human rights. She has worked to empower women founders and workplace equality. She was one of the founders of the campaign - Break the Silence #AskforZarni - a movement to fight sexual harassment in social spaces by educating bar staff and providing strategies to help the people who experience it. She hopes to study psychology abroad, and make mental health support more widely accessible in Myanmar.

Susan Schuppli

[1]
Susan Schuppli is a researcher and artist based in the UK whose work examines material evidence from war and conflict to environmental disasters and climate change.

Susan Schuppli is a researcher and artist based in the UK whose work examines material evidence from war and conflict to environmental disasters and climate change. Current work is focused on learning from ice and the politics of cold.

Creative projects have been exhibited throughout Europe, Asia, Canada, and the US. She has published widely within the context of media and politics and is author of the book, Material Witness published by MIT Press in 2020.

Schuppli is Reader and Director of the Centre for Research Architecture, Goldsmiths University of London where she is also an affiliate artist-researcher and Board Chair of Forensic Architecture. Previously she was Senior Research Fellow and Project Co-ordinator of Forensic Architecture. Prior to working in the UK she was an Associate Professor in visual/media arts in Canada. Schuppli received her PhD from Goldsmiths and participated in the Whitney Independent Study Program after completing her MFA at the University of California San Diego. She is the recipient of the 2016 ICP Infinity Award.

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Tamar Shafrir

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Tamar Shafrir is a design writer and researcher based in Amsterdam.

Tamar Shafrir is a design writer and researcher based in Amsterdam. She is co-head of the Design Curating & Writing master’s programme at Design Academy Eindhoven. She is also a lecturer at London College of Communication. Previously, she was a design researcher at Het Nieuwe Instituut and co-founder of the studio Space Caviar.

Tamiko Thiel

[2]
Tamiko Thiel is a visual artist exploring the interplay of place, space, the body and cultural identity.

Tamiko Thiel is a visual artist exploring the interplay of place, space, the body and cultural identity. She works in a variety of media ranging from supercomputers to digital prints and videos to interactive 3d virtual reality worlds and augmented and mixed reality artworks and installations.

Tianling Yang

[1]
Tianling Yang is a doctoral researcher in the research group "Data, Algorithmic Systems and Ethics" at the Weizenbaum Institute and at Technische Universität Berlin.

Tianling Yang is a doctoral researcher in the research group "Data, Algorithmic Systems and Ethics" at the Weizenbaum Institute and at Technische Universität Berlin. She studied Social Sciences at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. She investigates the contexts and working conditions of the production of machine learning data, with a special focus on the contexts in China. She is interested in the power dynamics that shape data production and annotation tools and interfaces.

Tobias Revell

[1]
Tobias Revell is an artist and designer. Spanning different disciplines and media his work addresses the urgent need for critical engagement with material reality through design, art and technology.

Tobias Revell is an artist and designer. Spanning different disciplines and media his work addresses the urgent need for critical engagement with material reality through design, art and technology. Recent work has looked at the idea of technology as a territory, expectations of the future, rendering software and the occult and supernatural in pop culture discussions of technology.
He holds a BA Hons. (1st) in Design for Interaction and Moving Image from the London College of Communication and an MA in Design Interactions at the Royal College of Art from which he graduated in July 2012.
As well as being an internationally exhibiting artist, Acting Programme Director of Graphic Design Communication at the London College of Communication, a founder of Supra Systems Studio and a founding member of research consultancy Strange Telemetry. He is one half of Haunted Machines, a research and curatorial project curating Impakt festival 2017 in Utrecht, NL. He is undertaking a PhD in the Design Department at Goldsmiths, University of London.

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Wendy McMurdo

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Wendy McMurdo is an artist known for her work exploring the relationship of children and photography to the computer.

Wendy McMurdo was born in Edinburgh where she initially trained as a painter. She left the UK in the mid 1980s for the Pratt Institute, New York. While studying there, she turned to photography and on returning to the UK, began to work for the first time with this medium. After completing an MA at Goldsmiths College, London, she was awarded a two-year fellowship by The Henry Moore Foundation. The rapid proliferation of computers in schools provided the context for the development of her next body of work that looked directly at the influence of computers on early years education. McMurdo has exhibited throughout Europe in exhibitions such as The Anagrammatical Body: The Body and its Photographic Condition curated by Christa Steinle and Peter Weibel for ZKM, Karlsruhe, Germany; Uncanny, curated by Urs Stahel for the Fotomuseum Wintherthur and Only Make Believe curated by Marina Warner for Compton Verney, Warwickshire, UK. In 2015 she was awarded a PhD by publication by the University of Westminster for her work exploring the relationship of children and photography to the computer.

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xtine burrough

[2]
xtine burrough is a hybrid artist. She uses remix as a strategy for engaging networked audiences in critical participation at the intersection of media art and digital poetry.

Sabrina Starnaman researches socially-engaged literature, particularly Progressive Era (1880-1930) American texts about women’s activism, urbanism, and disability that explores how activists remediated exploitative labor practices, racism, and poverty. Her work brings the voices of overlooked writers, particularly women writers, back into the public consciousness. Starnaman is an Associate Professor of Instruction of Literature and Director of Research for LabSynthE, a laboratory for synthetic, electronic poetry at the University of Texas at Dallas. burrough and Sabrina Starnaman’s collaborations are accessible on VisibleWomen.net.

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Yani Kong

[1]
Yani Kong is a writer, editor, and scholar of contemporary art in Vancouver, Canada.

Yani Kong is a writer, editor, and scholar of contemporary art in Vancouver, Canada. She has recently published essays for the Gordon and Marion Smith Foundation, Vancouver BC, the Freedman Gallery, Reading PA, and is a regular contributor to Galleries West.  She is SSHRC Doctoral Fellow of Contemporary Art at the School for the Contemporary Arts (SCA), Simon Fraser University, researching reception aesthetics and contemporary art history. As a member of the Low Carbon Research Methods Working Group, she explores sustainable practices in streaming media. Kong is a faculty member in the department of art history and religious studies at Langara College and the Yukon/BC representative for the Universities Arts Association Congress.

Yung Au

[1]
Yung Au is a researcher at the University of Oxford with affiliations with the University Arts London, No Tech for Tyrants, and the Future Imperatives Collection.

Yung Au is a researcher at the University of Oxford with affiliations with the University Arts London, No Tech for Tyrants, and the Future Imperatives Collection.